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  • http://www.bienenkiste.de/projekt/intro/intro.0/index.html

    Startseite » Projekt-Info » Einführung » Überblick

    Bildunterschrift: A beekeeping mentor helps with the first steps

    Overview

    The Bienenkiste ("BEE-nən-KISS-tə") was designed as a relatively low-maintenance approach to keeping bees. It is intended for the would-be beekeeper interested in harvesting a small amount of honey for personal consumption but unable or unwilling to devote his or her entire free time to the hobby.

    We rely on a minimal level of intervention in the natural life cycle of the bee colony, an approach that emphasizes the integrity and well-being of the colony as a whole, while at the same time requiring a minimal level of initial expertise.

    Page 1 of 7 [Hinweis: KMP hat den Beitrag zuletzt am vor 5 Jahren, 4 Monaten geändert.]
      Kevin M. Pfeiffer - Berlin (Mitglied, Imkerverein Kreuzberg e.V.) - Imkerbuch - Stockwaage - Visitenkarte
    • http://www.bienenkiste.de/projekt/intro/intro.1/index.html

      Startseite » Projekt-Info » Einführung » Die Krise

      The crisis
      The "beekeeper's decline" is the death of the honey bee!


      The honey bee plays a crucial role in our agriculture and food production, as well as in the ecological system as a whole. But beekeeping is facing a crisis:

      The European honey bee today is dependent on the beekeeper for its survival. Sufficient natural resources for housing and maintaining wild colonies no longer exist; nor is our honey bee able to survive the onslaught of the invasive parasite the varroa mite.

      The dual threats of the varroa mite and the widespread use of pesticides are all the talk these days, but ultimately responsible for the decline of the honey bee is the declining number of beekeepers!

      The lack of new blood -- new beekeepers -- is the greatest problem facing the European honey bee in the future.

      Many people today are (once more) interested in the environment and our natural world and are well informed about environmental issues. At the same time, the honey bee remains one of the most appealing and sympathetic of the many creatures in our natural world.

      So why then, when so many are concerned about the welfare and future of the honey bee, do so few become beekeepers?


      Page 2 of 7 [Hinweis: KMP hat den Beitrag zuletzt am vor 5 Jahren, 5 Monaten geändert.]
        Kevin M. Pfeiffer - Berlin (Mitglied, Imkerverein Kreuzberg e.V.) - Imkerbuch - Stockwaage - Visitenkarte
      • http://www.bienenkiste.de/projekt/intro/intro.2/index.html
        Startseite » Projekt-Info » Einführung » keine Zukunft

        The part-time beekeeper
        Why the traditional approach no longer makes sense

        Traditionally beekeeping has provided the non-commercial beekeeper with an additional means of income, but this model is no longer consistent with the realities of today's wages and prices:

        To produce a surplus of honey for the purpose of selling it once made sense -- workers' wages were low and food was expensive. Today things are just the opposite. Good honey is imported from abroad and can be purchased at very reasonable prices.

        Once we calculate an even halfway appropriate hourly wage for the labor and include the actual investment costs, the outlook for part-time beekeeping as a means of additional income is rather bleak.

        At the same time, the demands of our lives today are often so complex and multifaceted that many of us simply are unable to devote so much time and energy to a single hobby.


        The "investment-yield spiral"

        Even when the novice beekeeper's goal is just to "keep a few bees" -- for the enjoyment of nature and to harvest one's own honey -- it is easy to become caught up in an endless spiral of tasks and demands: frames have to be built, storage space found for extra supers and combs, en extractor needs to be acquired, transport considered, and so forth...

        The effort required to keep one or two hives quickly begins to feel inefficient, and suddenly one is caring for ten hives, harvesting several hundred kilos of honey and looking for a stand at the weekend farmers' market...

        The traditional beekeeper is intent on maximizing production

        The traditional multi-super configuration with removable frames (actually all removable-frame methods) are based on the standards of industrial agriculture: standardized equipment, standardized treatment, maximum yield.

        Beekeeping is intrinsically a natural, organic sort of activity. The modern method of beekeeping, however, is not so far removed from other forms of mass husbandry:
        We provide the bees with a pre-determined artificial living environment in the form of pressed sheets of wax and frames, the honey-combed structure in which the bees live is regularly disassembled and rearranged, the reproductive drive (swarm behavior) is suppressed, the drone population is eliminated, etc....

        Yet, for millions of years already, honey bee colonies having been managing their affairs themselves! If it were not for the lack of sufficient natural habitat for hive-building -- that and the varroa mite -- the honey bee would not need us at all. Why then all this effort?

        Shouldn't providing the bee colony with a suitable home and protecting it from the varroa mite be enough!?


        Page 3 of 7 [Hinweis: KMP hat den Beitrag zuletzt am vor 5 Jahren, 5 Monaten geändert.]
          Kevin M. Pfeiffer - Berlin (Mitglied, Imkerverein Kreuzberg e.V.) - Imkerbuch - Stockwaage - Visitenkarte
        • Startseite » Projekt-Info » Einführung » keep it simple
          http://www.bienenkiste.de/projekt/intro/intro.3/index.html

          Keep it simple!
          Requirements for a new approach to keeping bees


          There are many nature and garden lovers today who cultivate their own small garden or keep a couple rabbits for the children without having any desire for or interest in a financial return. They simply want to live close to nature and make it possible for their children, too, to share in such experiences.

          Thus the focus is on leisure and recreation, as well as a more holistic, informed approach to living. Perhaps here, too, the desire for a certain degree of small-scale self-sufficiency -- "homemade and organically grown" -- comes into play.

          We believe that there are many who would be interested in caring for one or two bee hives if the effort required were not so great. Such "backyard beekeepers" would be more than pleased simply to harvest enough honey to for their own breakfast table.

          To meet these objectives, we have established the following requirements:

          minimal, affordable equipment need
          reasonable demand on time and effort
          a holistic approach (i.e., to the extent possible, a hands-off approach that minimizes hive intervention)
          overwintering own their own honey (no additional sugar supplements)


          Page 4 of 7 [Hinweis: KMP hat den Beitrag zuletzt am vor 5 Jahren, 5 Monaten geändert.]
            Kevin M. Pfeiffer - Berlin (Mitglied, Imkerverein Kreuzberg e.V.) - Imkerbuch - Stockwaage - Visitenkarte
          • Startseite » Projekt-Info » Einführung » Bauernstock
            http://www.bienenkiste.de/projekt/intro/intro.4/index.html

            The Krainer (Carniolan) beehive
            A new look at a tried-and-true concept


            Our efforts led us to rediscover the traditional Krainer Bauernstock, the hive in which the Carniolan bee was originally bred:

            The entrance is on the front end.
            The use of wax starter strips provides the bees with the desired (lengthwise) comb-building orientation.
            The hive is worked from below and thus has to be turned over so that the bottom can be removed.
            Honey reserves are stored by the bees at the rear of the hive, the end most distant from the entrance; honey comb to be harvested is cut out using a knife.
            The combs are pressed to extract the honey (no centrifugal extractor).

            Page 5 of 7 [Hinweis: KMP hat den Beitrag zuletzt am vor 5 Jahren, 4 Monaten geändert.]
              Kevin M. Pfeiffer - Berlin (Mitglied, Imkerverein Kreuzberg e.V.) - Imkerbuch - Stockwaage - Visitenkarte
            • Startseite » Projekt-Info » Einführung » Die Bienenkiste
              http://www.bienenkiste.de/projekt/intro/intro.5/index.html


              The Bienenkiste
              - a modified version of the Krainer Bauernstock


              The basic concept of the Krainer hive has been retained; the size has been increased and expanded to include a specially adapted rear honey compartment:

              [Foto]

              - Internal dimensions of the Bienenkiste: width 100cm, length 45cm, height 21cm (volume: ca. 90 liters)

              - To work the hive it is lifted from the rear and inclined forward until it is resting on the projecting roof overhang. A small stanchion supports the hive in this position, thus ensuring a back-friendly ergonomic approach.

              - The honey compartment is outfitted with wax foundation (see below)

              - Honey extraction relies on the low-tech crush-and-strain method

              The key is the "honey compartment"

              In order to easily harvest honey from the Bienenkiste, as well as to somewhat slow the swarming urge, we provide the bees with sheets of embossed pure beeswax. These are placed in the rear third of the hive -- the honey compartment -- and will be built out by the bees to form honey comb. Why?

              Empty comb in the hive motivates bees to collect and store more nectar (honey). Artificially expanding the extent of comb beyond that which the colony itself would build encourages the production of additional honey. At the same time it serves to moderate the colony's reproductive (swarm) behavior: the first priority is to keep the pantry well-stocked.

              This "trick" is the basis of all modern beekeeping methods. With the Bienenkiste we have merely simplified the approach in order to integrate it into the Bienenkiste concept.


              Page 6 of 7
              [Hinweis: KMP hat den Beitrag zuletzt am vor 5 Jahren, 4 Monaten geändert.]
                Kevin M. Pfeiffer - Berlin (Mitglied, Imkerverein Kreuzberg e.V.) - Imkerbuch - Stockwaage - Visitenkarte
              • Startseite » Projekt-Info » Einführung » Jahreslauf
                http://www.bienenkiste.de/projekt/intro/intro.6/index.html

                The beekeeping season with the Bienenkiste

                An overview of the individual tasks


                Winter
                The colony spends the winter in the front compartment of the hive, which is set off from the rear third by a divider board. During this time no work is necessary (or possible). The bees are left to rely on their own resources and consume honey and pollen as needed.

                Spring
                At about the time when the fruit trees come into bloom (end of April/beginning of May) the divider between the brood space and the honey compartment is removed and twelve sheets of beeswax foundation are added in the rear.

                Swarm season (May and June in western-central Europe)
                We check every one to two weeks for the presence of queen cells in the hive. To do this the hive is opened and the underside of the combs are inspected for signs of the characteristic queen cells.

                If a colony is preparing to swarm, it is possible to ascertain the date on which this is likely to occur. If we are lucky enough to be present (or are contacted by the neighbor) when the swarm departs, we can collect the swarm and thus acquire a new colony of bees to be placed in a new hive or passed along to a friend.

                Honey harvest
                Depending on the timing of local nectar flows, honey can be harvested in June or July. One the evening before the harvest, we use a sharp knife to pre-segment the honey combs at the (one-third) point where they pass from the honey compartment into the main chamber of the hive. The following morning we carefully lift up and remove the top bars with the attached combs of honey.

                The comb is then sliced off the top bar, cut into small pieces, and placed in a strainer or filter. The honey drips through and the beeswax remains behind.

                Winter preparations
                September: The divider separating brood and honey compartments is placed back in the hive and we inspect the honey reserves, feeding with a sugar solution as necessary to ensure sufficient winter reserves. Once temperatures start to drop to the point that the bees no longer are regularly leaving the hive we attach a wire screen to the entrance; this discourages mice from taking up winter residence.

                Varroa treatment
                Late November or early-to-mid December we open the Bienenkiste hive one last time and trickle an oxalic acid and sugar solution in between combs. This is highly effective in checking the rapid summertime expansion of the varroa mite.
                Information in detail...


                Page 7 of 7
                [Hinweis: KMP hat den Beitrag zuletzt am vor 5 Jahren, 4 Monaten geändert.]
                  Kevin M. Pfeiffer - Berlin (Mitglied, Imkerverein Kreuzberg e.V.) - Imkerbuch - Stockwaage - Visitenkarte
                • Hallo Jutta,

                  Jutta50 schrieb am 08.01.2014, 12:54
                  a friend or friends?

                  Danke, korrigiert.

                  Hinsichtlich deiner Textarbeit, halte dich bitte an die Arbeitslauf und -anweisungen hier:
                  http://forum.bienenkiste.de/forums/thread/1152/translating-the-bk-website-into-english#dis-post-5849

                  Also, keine Word-Datei, keine Vermischung der Beiträgen, immer mit Bread-Crumb-Link (wie in meinen Beiträgen), eine ganze Webseite in einem einzigen neuen Beitrag (auch wenn es nur Stück für Stück geht -- man kann den Beitrag immer nachändern).

                  Schöne Grüße

                  Kevin

                  P.S. -- alle andere Beiträge hier werde ich entfernen -- bitte allgemeine Fragen, Diskussionen usw. HIER posten: http://forum.bienenkiste.de/forums/thread/1152/translating-the-bk-website-into-english#dis-post-5849
                  [Hinweis: KMP hat den Beitrag zuletzt am vor 5 Jahren, 4 Monaten geändert.]
                    Kevin M. Pfeiffer - Berlin (Mitglied, Imkerverein Kreuzberg e.V.) - Imkerbuch - Stockwaage - Visitenkarte